Can I Whiten My Teeth If I Have Bonding?

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Hi, I’m Dr. B, practicing functional dentist for 35 years. I graduated from the Dugoni School of Dentistry in San Francisco, CA in 1987 and am a member of the American Academy of Dental Sleep Medicine (AADSM), Academy of General Dentistry (Chicago, IL), American Academy for Oral Systemic Health (AAOSH), and Dental Board of California. I'm on a mission to empower people everywhere with the same evidence-based, easy-to-understand dental health advice that my patients get. Learn more about Dr. B
Q:

I have bonding on my teeth, but want to whiten them. I am curious if this is possible, and what the best way to whiten without damaging my bonding is.

A: First of all, you can whiten and not damage your bonding. The pH of whitening gels is neutral and will not etch or harm the bonding.

The real issue with whitening when bonding is present is the disparity that will occur over time as the tooth lightens in color and the bonding does not.

It would be best to go see your dentist in this case because some very thin bonding on the front teeth has the potential to exhibit a chameleon-like effect and could match the new, lighter color that you achieve with whitening.

The chameleon-like effect is dependent upon the manufacturer of the material of your bonding.

Ultimately, the results are unpredictable, and the worst case scenario is that you have to replace the bonding to a lighter color.

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